Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Quote Of the Moment



Word on the street is that Lupe's album is on point.


Now i aint tryna be the greatest
I used to hate hip hop
Yep, because the women degraded
But Too Short made me laugh,
Like a hypocrit i played it
A hypocrit i state it
Though I only recited half
Omittin the word bitch, cursin i wouldnt say it
Me and dawg couldnt relate to the bitch that i dated
Forgive my favorite word for hers and hers alike
But i heard it from a song i heard and sorta liked
Yea, for the ice and glamourized drug dealin
Was appealin but the block club kept it from infront of our buildin
Gangsta rap base filmins became the buildin blocks for children
With leakin ceilins catchin drippens with pots
Couple word compositions from pac
Nas's it was written
In the mix with my realities, and feelins
Livin conditions, religion, ignorant wisdom
And artistic vision i began to jot
Tap the world and listen, it dropped:

My mom cant feed me
My boyfriend beats me
I have sex for money
The hood dont love me
The cops wanna kill me
This nonsense built me
And i got no place to go

They bomb my village
They call us killas
Took me off they wellfare
Cant afford they healthcare
My teacher wont teach me
My master beats me
And it hurts me soul


I had a ghetto boy boppa
Jay-z boycott
Cause he said that he never prayed to god he prayed to goddy
Im thinkin golly god guard me from the ungodly
But from my thirthieth watchin
The streets was watchin i was back to givin props again
And that was botherin
Bout as uncomfortable as a untouchable touchin you
The theme songs that niggas hustle to
Seem wrong but these songs was comin true
And it was all becomin cool
I found a condom on the ground at johns recomin to and thought
What constitutes a prostitute is the pursuit of profit
Then they drop if the homie in the suit pat her on the butt then rock it
It seems i was seein the same scene adopted
Prefermentin different things with the witnesses and different to stop it
They said dont knock it mind your business
His business isnt mine then that nigga pimpin got it

They took my daughter
We aint got no water
I cant get hired
The cross on fire
We all got suspended
I just got sentenced
So i got no place to go

They threw down my gang sign
I aint got no hang time
They talkin bout my sneakers
They posoined our leader
My father aint seen me
Turn off my TV
And it hurts me soul


So through the grim reaper sickle sharpenin
Macintosh marketin, all you feel augurin
Brazilian adolescent disarmberment
Israeli occupation
Islamic moded him
precise
Yea, laser got a target in
Oil for full botherin
Terrorist organization harborin
Sand camoflague army men
CCF sponsorin, world conquerin, telephone monitorin
Louie Vuiton modelin, pornographic actress honorin
String theory ponderin, bullemick vomitin
Catholic preist fondlin ????
They breakin in my car again
be forestation in Ovalaganin (not spelt right)
Hennesey and hypnotic swallowin
Hydroponic coughin and
All the world's ills
Sittin on chrome 24 inch wheels
Like that

They say im infected
This is what i injected
I had it aborted
We got deported
My laptop got spyware
Say that i cant lie here
But i got no place to go

I cant stop eatin
My best friends leavin
My pastor touched me
I love this country
I lost my ear piece
I hope yall hear me
Cause it hurts me soul

9 comments:

Brother Lightness said...

It's not the word on the street, it's fact. I implore our readers to PURCHASE this album. If you're not satisfied I'll refund the hard-earned dollars used to make the purchase.

Lupe is intelligent, relevant and articulate.

Brother Smartness said...

I was entertained, but not satisfied. My only regret is that you (Brother Lightness) didn't make that offer earlier.

I agree he is all the things you believe him to be, i.e. intelligent, relevant and articulate. There was, however, something missing from this highly anticipated album.

Brother Lightness said...

Smartness,

I believe you're making reference to the decidedly unassuming undertone of the album.

In staying true to his art form Fiasco offers a work that is (perhaps detrimentally) deemed experimental when placed against the average hip-hop offering.

That which you find lacking may be the result of a focus on offering actual content versus disposable "hip-pop".

Brother Smartness said...

He who has skills need not remind us by boasting. “Don’t talk about it, be about it” That Diddy verse immediately comes to mind when I think about bravado in hip-hop. I would agree that the album is indeed unassuming. Again, I was entertained by the album. But I just wasn’t satisfied. I get the sense that the meaning behind some of these tracks was intentionally ambiguous. Witty metaphors and similes are in overabundance. But just because they don’t refer to the typical hip-hop subject matter (i.e., selling drugs, prostitution) doesn’t make the album more content-based than other hip-hop albums.

Brother Smartness said...

What’s the problem with being intentionally ambiguous? Well for starters, we are talking about a period of crisis within hip-hop.

It would be one thing to have a message and then to ask that the listener interpret it in his or her own way. It is something entirely different, however, to have no clear message in your songs, but rather, some witty metaphors and an ambiguous/shaky theme. The current state of hip-hop requires a pioneer such as Lupe to do the former rather than the latter. Two or three songs on the album seem to be doing the latter.

Brother Smartness said...

Finally, when you don’t come strong with the message, all the metaphors in the world will not be suitable to deceive the listener into believe that a song is powerful when it really isn’t. You’ll play it a few times and eventually realize that it has no legs.

Legs are crucial.

Brother Lightness said...

Intentionally ambiguous? I'll forgive you for making that statement, as you know not the error of your ways: http://www.allhiphop.com/reviews/index.asp?ID=961

I believe Lupe did come strong with his message, nestling it within his artistry for the consumer to work through in their exercise of listening. As an artist, he's entitled to do such. Lazy listerners may disagree.

"Coming strong with the message" has never been well-received in hip-hop, leaving such credible MC's as Jay-Z to inevitably dumb down their message.

If you want to see someone "Com[e] strong with the message" you should evoke the spirits of Malcolm and Martin. Let's not pigeonhole our most talented MC's by asking them to cheapen their respective crafts in an effort to get things across to an obtuse American audience.

Hip-hop deserves better.

Brother Smartness said...

And I’ll forgive you for giving us a link to an article that neither weakens nor strengthens the argument that Lupe is “intentionally ambiguous.” The only thing that comes remotely close to this is the mention of his lyrics as “dark lyrics.”

You misunderstand me when I say “come strong with a message”. You equate a strong message with convoluted lyrics, but there is no correlation between the two. Perhaps Jay-Z had to dumb down his lyrics, but the "message" always remains.

Furthermore, one need not be conscious in order to have a message. There are plenty of lyrics that are not conscious that achieve this end.

With conviction, again I assert that "a message" is lacking on several tracks in this album.

Kick Push for instance...

Not about selling crack or anything else. Just about a dude skateboarding.

Lupe Fiasco, by his own admission, said the above during a Rhapsody interview. The program requires a subscription so, unfortunately, I can not place a link in this message.

Kudos to Lupe for rapping about something different on Kick Push, but I keep hearing people talking about it as though it's the fulfillment of the prophesy pertaining to the avant garde hip-hop movement.

I, like everyone else, am thirsty for some realness in hip-hop music; something different from what is in the mainstream. My thirst, however, and my desire to quench that thirst, won't permit me to settle for anything that is remotely conscious...even if, AllHipHop gives it four stars.

Brother Smartness said...

I want to reiterate that I enjoyed the album.

There is a big difference, however, between enjoying an album and giving it all the praise in the world; praise that is not merited by content, but is given simply because there a few artists of his sort in mainstream American hip-hop.