Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Ghetto Rhymes - The Apocalypse Is Upon Us

7 comments:

Brother Spotless said...

eh...I don't see much wrong with this. At the very least, 70% of rap lyrics and videos are worse than "Her husband for 17 years, left her with 17 kids, and now she has to rough it."

Rich Boy will do more to bring us to Armageddon than "Ghetto Rhymes" will...

Brother Lightness said...

You don't see the problematic issue of Ghetto Rhymes replacing Dr. Seuss? Would you not find it problematic if this was included as suggested reading material during your child's developmental period?

I'd imagine that the majority of those who listen to Rich Boy have at least learned to read, without hood stereotypes directly being fed to them as legitimate adolescent literature.

Brother Spotless said...

First off, my children will be reading Plato's Republic and W.E.B Dubois' Miseducation...and niether Ghetto Rhymes nor Dr. Seuss will set foot in my house. But that's another matter...

I'm not sure why Dr. Seuss holds such a special place in your heart, but there's nothing in it that would lead me to believe that there is content worth cherishing.

As far as Ghetto Rhymes is concerned, the clip doesn't show me any glorification of ghetto life. What's the problem with Ms. Muffett eating grits instead of kerds (not to be confused with Kurds. what are kerds, anyway?)?

I understand that there is a fine line between discussing life in the ghetto and poking fun in a minstrel-like manner, but I haven't found evidence suggesting that the authors of this book crossed that line. Please point that out to me.

Again, degenerative rap music videos are doing more to destroy black children's development than a book of this nature ever could. While I do agree that there is some controversy surrounding whether children should even be aware of a father leaving a mother with 17 children (and the circumstances surrounding both having 17 children and dead-beat dad issues), I wouldn't give this apocolyptic standing. There are a slew of moral, cultural, and developmental differences between Ghetto Rhymes and something like a Mz. Peachez video. Placing the two in the same category seems problematic to any effort to rid our culture of nonsense, if for no other reason than it casts too wide a net and pulls in materials that don't necessarily belong.

To answer your question, Lightness: I'd probably use a book like Ghetto Rhymes to discuss realities that my adolescent children may not be aware of in a light-hearted manner, so to not knock them over with severely harsh realities. However, I'd probably avoid reading it to my pre-adolescent children, simply because there won't be much time between discussing Plato's nation-state and Dubois understanding of the turn-of-the-century Negro (read: there are simply better things to read).

Brother Lightness said...

I'll pray for your misguided offspring.

Brother Spotless said...

If the prophesy is correct, then the child should have to pay,
For the sins of the father, so I’ll borrow my tomorrows,
Against my yesterdays, in hopes that she’ll be ok.

Prayer is indeed needed for all of our children...

Brother Lightness said...

Don't use hip-hop parables to legitimize your poor parenting choices.

Brother Spotless said...

Don't hate because my kids will be reading W.E.B. and yours will be reading Dr. Seuss and listening to Rich Boy...