Thursday, April 12, 2007

Cartoon of the Day


8 comments:

Brother Spotless said...

I absolutely hate the fact that we couldn't get our ish together on our own. This issue of derogatory language in rap music has become a Fox News rallying point, an excuse used to defend a racist like Don Imus. Our own hypocrisy (the idea that we alone can use "nigga" and call black women hoes) has given credibility to racists and the far (social) right alike, both of whom would like nothing more than to poke and prod at Black America, and stick a sharp needle in our proverbial balloon of progress. I hope this Imus issue (as well as the Michael Richards saga) teaches Black America at large to look at its own self in the mirror before berating others. We have to end the hypocrisy, for our own sake.

I will now step down off of my soapbox...

Solgenique said...

Back in the 60's, John Lennon's quote that the Beatles were "more popular than Jesus" sent a bevy of folks in a tizzy!

A bunch of radio stations 'round the world stopped playing their music, the band was burned in effigy, and communities had themselves gay old bonefires sessions throwing Beatles 'nalia and albums into the pits...

Y'all bring y'all's rap albums where women are disrespected (and I better see a couple of Jay-Z albums in there!) and I'll bring the mac n' cheese. Deal?

Brother Spotless said...

If I thought that would work, I'd be right there with you Solgenique. However, there are far too many music media outlets available for a burning of cds to be effective.

You can still bring the mac n' cheese. I'll fry some fish we can get down...

Anonymous said...

Why are we buying into this kind of racist diversion? Imus calls a group of intelligent young women "nappy headed hos" and his producer compares them to "jigaboos vs wannabes", and somehow this is the fault of the rappers? Come on. Even if we wanted to pursue that line of logic, why dont we blame the white people (the record executives) who hire these rappers, and then feed them their image? Or the white people who buy their cds. Black people dont need to boycott gangsta rap because WE DO NOT BUY THE CDS ANYWAY (statistically speaking, 80% of records are bought by white people). The only reason they want us to say that we are going to boycott it is so that these impressionable white youth who buy the rap CDs (who only buy them so they can have something to converse with black youth) will stop buying them.

Furthermore, why do we like to trick ourselves into thinking that the black community objectifies women the most? Have you seen commercials for Girls Gone Wild recently? Produced by white people - and usually all you see is white people. Why isnt FOX talking about that?

I am sorry, but I think this country is so hypocritical, that I feel sick to my stomach when it tries to point fingers at another groups so-called "hypocrisy".

-H-

solgenique said...

I guess it would be more for symbolism that real change, Brother Spotless. And I suppose deleting mp3s just doesn't have the same effect. But I still think it should be done.

----

H,

We can rally for Sean Bell, Abner Louima, Amadou Diallo, and Rodney King in the fight against institutionalized racism in the police force that uses young black men as target practice, but let us ask that the music that is made by black people, using black urban vernacular, dressed in black urban clothing, fronted by black people, that (aside from Oprah and Dr. Rice) is, worldwide, the only image of black women, that shows them as gold-digging, only-good-for-sex, and un-valuabe beings to change and we're falling prey to "racist diversion."

Gotcha!

Anonymous said...

What I mean by racist diversion is the fact that I dont think we ask ourselves enough questions. We label it as black music because what we see are black faces dressed in black urban wear, performing these songs. What I am saying, however, is that the people who choose which songs are going to be put out there are not black. They are the ones who are telling you what "black music" is. Personally, when I think of "black music", I think of Jazz, motown, and certain hip-hop artists (Nas, Mos Def, etc).

Sure you can say that these black artists decide that they are going to make these coon-ish songs (shake that laffy taffy and chicken noodle soup anyone?), but the people that who decide that these songs will get more airplay over a 2pac song celebrating motherhood, or Kanye's mother song, or most positive music, are white people.

While I do agree that black people shouldnt fall into these traps where they are easily made into embarassments for the entire community (ie: Ying Yang Twins and Flava Flav), I also dont buy the whole "black people should boycott this music" garbage because white people are again using race as an excuse to divert our attention from the real problem - socioeconomic defficiencies that lead our youth into thinking that the only methods for escaping the ghetto are 1. Selling drugs. 2. Entertaining (sports, music, etc) or 3. Going to prison.

So yes, focusing on cutting off a branch of the tree (which is what I equate this whole diversion of pointing our fingers at rap music)will not solve the problem of the tree being in your way.

-H-

Anonymous said...

Furthermore, I remember being at a lecture when someone brought up the point that when George W. Bush gets up there and says something idiotic ("is our children learning"...come on), "white" people dont feel bad. But let a black politician get up there and say something stupid and almost every black person in the country cringes in embarassment. Why? Because we continually allow white people to tell us who represents us instead of us saying "No. These rappers are not representative of our community any much as any other white racist or white dumbass is representative of yours. So we are not going defend hip hop becaused we dont have to."

-H-

Anonymous said...

Black people, we should stop being surprised that white people say racist s#*t with any remorse, just like us.